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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:53 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Prediction

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 1:44 pm

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now panel, what will we all do now that we can't go on the internet safely? Luke Burbank?

LUKE BURBANK: Resort to the unthinkable. Feeling our feelings for the briefest of moments.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: I refuse. Amy Dickinson?

AMY DICKINSON: Instead of posting on Facebook, maybe we'll put our face in a book?

(APPLAUSE)

DICKINSON: It could happen.

SAGAL: And Charlie Pierce?

CHARLIE PIERCE: Go out in the backyard and make real birds really angry.

(LAUGHTER)

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:53 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Lightning Fill In The Blank

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 1:44 pm

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now on to our final game, Lightning Fill in the Blank.

CHARLIE PIERCE: Now on to our final game, Lightning Fill in the Blank.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Each of our players will have 60 seconds in which to answer as many fill in the blank questions as they can. Each correct answer now worth two points. Carl, please can you give us the scores?

CARL KASELL, BYLINE: Luke Burbank has the lead, he has four points. Amy Dickinson and Charlie Pierce are tied for second, each has two.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:53 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Limericks

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 1:44 pm

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

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Deep In The Heart Of (A Transforming) Texas
4:41 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

LBJ Carried Poor Texas Town With Him In Civil Rights Fight

Long before he was president, Lyndon Johnson taught in Cotulla, Texas. He is pictured here with students in 1928.
Courtesy of LBJ Library

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 1:34 am

Today Cotulla, Texas, is reaping the benefits of an oil and natural gas boom in the Eagle Ford Shale. But in 1928, the South Texas town was incredibly poor — and that's how Lyndon Johnson saw it when he had his first job there at age 20.

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All Tech Considered
4:31 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Can't Ask That? Some Job Interviewers Go To Social Media Instead

In the hiring process, there are things employers aren't permitted to ask, like whether you plan to have kids. Some employers turn to social media to learn more about job candidates.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 1:49 pm

Many of Don Kluemper's management students at the University of Illinois at Chicago have had this experience: After going on a job interview, they sometimes receive "friend" requests from their interviewers.

It puts the students in a bind, he says. They fear that not accepting the request might hurt their job chances, but they also feel compelled to scrub their profiles before accepting.

"They didn't know why they were being friended," Kluemper says. "If it was some personal request or if the person was going to be screening their profile."

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