Justin Catanoso

Justin Catanoso is senior lecturer and director of journalism at Wake Forest University. He has also had a 30-year career as a professional journalist at newspapers in Pennsylvania, Tennessee and North Carolina. He was founding executive editor of The Business Journal in the Triad, which started publishing in 1998. There, he helped lead a newsroom in its coverage of business and economic  trends across the region. Previously, Justin spent 11 years as a reporter with the News & Record of Greensboro. There he received a Pulitzer Prize nomination in 1992 for his investigative reporting into fraud in the tobacco industry. That project was awarded the Science in Society Award by the National Association of Science Writers. He won numerous state and national writing honors while at the News & Record and The Business Journal.

In 2008, HarperCollins published his first book, a family memoir titled My Cousin the Saint, A Search for Faith, Family, and Miracles. Harper Perennial published it in paperback in 2009. My Cousin the Saint was a Book of the Month Club selection and a summer reading pick by the Order Sons of Italy in America. Justin's writing has also appeared in The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, BusinessWeek, US Airways and Delta inflight magazines, Catholic Digest,  and on National Public Radio.

Justin  is married to singer-songwriter Laurelyn Dossett. They live in Greensboro and have three daughters.

Pages

Health
4:13 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Urgent Care Centers Could See Expanded Role Under Obamacare

Medical exam room
Credit Indiana Public Media

Urgent Care Centers have been around for years, but their role is likely to expand under Affordable Care Act. Business Journal contributing writer Justin Catanoso discusses the new law’s impact on both the centers and hospitals with WFDD's Audrey Fannin. Justin is also director of the Wake Forest University journalism program.

Read more
Regional Growth
7:00 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Deere-Hitachi Expands, TIMCO Waits and the Rhino Returns

Deere-Hitachi is is celebrating its 25th anniversary in Kernersville, and starting a $97 million expansion, the largest in its history.
Credit Deere-Hitachi / http://www.dhkernersville.com/

Each Friday WFDD takes a look at business in the Triad.   This week instead of focusing on one topic, we'll review three developments in area business with Justin Catanoso, contributing writer for the Business Journal and director of Wake Forest University's journalism program.  

Read more
Banking
7:00 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Local Bank Branches: Some Disappear, Most Adapt

Local bank branches are responding to changes in technology.
Credit CarbonNYC via flickr

  It's Friday, and for many people, that means it's payday!

 

That used to mean long lines at the bank or drive-through to deposit or cash the check – but now people are just as likely to use direct deposit or an ATM to accomplish the same thing. Justin Catanoso, contributing writer with the Business Journal, and director of Wake Forest University's journalism program, discusses how technology is changing local bank branches with WFDD's Audrey Fannin.

 

Read more
Global Warming
7:00 am
Thu September 26, 2013

Is Climate Change the Global Challenge for Our Generation?

Miles Silman and Justin Catanoso at the southern-most entrance to Manu National Park at an elevation of 13,000 feet. It was taken before they loaded up their packs and headed down into the Amazon basin.
Credit Ken Feeley

Every few generations, a challenge arises for leaders around the world.  In the final part of our series on climate change, Wake Forest biology professor, Miles Silman, and journalism program director, Justin Catanoso, discuss their recent research trip to Peru with WFDD's Audrey Fannin.

Funding for this series on climate change was made possible in part by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting in Washington, DC. 

Read more
Global Warming
7:00 am
Tue September 24, 2013

Climate Scientists Offer Ways Global Warming Can Be Controlled

Peruvian PhD biology students, who all assist Wake Forest biologist Miles Silman in his climate-change research in the Amazon basin, prepare to go into the field. From left: Richard Tito, William Farfan Rios and Alex Nina.
Justin Catanoso

Climate scientists paint a grim picture of life on earth in just a few generations given the steady march of global warming. Melting ice caps, rising sea levels and dying tropical forests are a part of that scene. What can be done to slow things down or turn them around? 

Read more

Pages