Justin Catanoso

Justin Catanoso is senior lecturer and director of journalism at Wake Forest University. He has also had a 30-year career as a professional journalist at newspapers in Pennsylvania, Tennessee and North Carolina. He was founding executive editor of The Business Journal in the Triad, which started publishing in 1998. There, he helped lead a newsroom in its coverage of business and economic  trends across the region. Previously, Justin spent 11 years as a reporter with the News & Record of Greensboro. There he received a Pulitzer Prize nomination in 1992 for his investigative reporting into fraud in the tobacco industry. That project was awarded the Science in Society Award by the National Association of Science Writers. He won numerous state and national writing honors while at the News & Record and The Business Journal.

In 2008, HarperCollins published his first book, a family memoir titled My Cousin the Saint, A Search for Faith, Family, and Miracles. Harper Perennial published it in paperback in 2009. My Cousin the Saint was a Book of the Month Club selection and a summer reading pick by the Order Sons of Italy in America. Justin's writing has also appeared in The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, BusinessWeek, US Airways and Delta inflight magazines, Catholic Digest,  and on National Public Radio.

Justin  is married to singer-songwriter Laurelyn Dossett. They live in Greensboro and have three daughters.

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Global Warming
7:00 am
Tue September 24, 2013

Climate Scientists Offer Ways Global Warming Can Be Controlled

Peruvian PhD biology students, who all assist Wake Forest biologist Miles Silman in his climate-change research in the Amazon basin, prepare to go into the field. From left: Richard Tito, William Farfan Rios and Alex Nina.
Justin Catanoso

Climate scientists paint a grim picture of life on earth in just a few generations given the steady march of global warming. Melting ice caps, rising sea levels and dying tropical forests are a part of that scene. What can be done to slow things down or turn them around? 

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Climate Change
7:00 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Tropical Scientists Fear Climate Change Will Cause Loss of Species in Amazon Rainforest

After three days of hiking mostly through dense jungle, we are rewarded with a vista of the Kosnipata Valley in Manu National Park in southern Peru.
Justin Catanoso

The impact of global warming on the Arctic poles is well documented and easy to see.  But scientists are just now beginning to understand the impact of rising temperatures on tropical forests around the equator. 

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Climate Change
7:00 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Biologists Studying Climate Change in Peru Discover Trees on the Move

Wake Forest biology Professor Miles Silman, co-founder of the Andes Biodiversity and Ecosystem Research Group, hiking downslope through Manu National Park in southern Peru.
Justin Catanoso

  Manu National Park in southern Peru is known as the most biologically diverse place on earth. It’s also a perfect laboratory for scientists to study the impact of global warming on tropical forests. 

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Health Care
12:06 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

Decisions Small Businesses Need to Make as Healthcare Exchanges Begin

Credit Tax Credits

More than 850-thousand North Carolinians are estimated to either have no health insurance or to be under-insured.  That is expected to change as of January 1st, when the main part of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, goes into effect.  Plan outlines have already been released by health insurance companies so individuals can begin their research, and next month they can begin applying for the plan they prefer.  Business Journal contributing writer

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Global Warming
7:02 am
Thu September 12, 2013

A Look at Global Warming from Atop the Peruvian Andes

It’s a winding, bumpy, six-hour ride from the city of Cuzco, Peru, to the southern entrance of Manu National Park. That’s where the tropical biologists have their research field down a steep gradient on the eastern slope of the Andes in the Amazon basin.
Justin Catanoso

When it comes to global warming, it’s easy to assume that the greatest impact is on our coldest climates, where we can see the polar ice caps melting before our eyes. But research coming out of Wake Forest University and elsewhere is establishing that the impact of rising temperatures could be even more dramatic at our warmer climates, like the tropical forests that ring the center of the Earth. WFDD contributor Justin Catanoso recently spent more than two weeks with tropical biologists hiking through the jungles and rain forests of southern Peru, recording his experience.

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