Arts
1:00 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Kripplekrunk, Faith Action International House, and Wayne Shorter

On today’s show we take a look at some men and women whose passion for the arts inspires, entertains, and informs. First up its Rex McGee and the merry band of musical mischief makers that call themselves KrippleKrunk. Their debut album was released last summer, and with lots of concerts on their horizon, it’s a perfect time to get familiar with the music of this diverse all instrumental band. Then we knock on the door of Faith Action International House, and learn how to go from stranger, to neighbor. Faith Action tackles the big issues surrounding immigration, but they do it in relatable, community driven, and artistically inclined ways. Then we close out today’s show with David Ford’s conversation with one of the greats from the world of jazz. Composer and saxophonist Wayne Shorter. Wayne just became an octogenarian , but trust that he has not slowed down one bit. In fact he just swept the Jazz awards, and won a Grammy.  

Kripplekrunk

The band Kripplekrunk started when multi-instrumentalist Rex McGee convinced friends from his annual trips to the Galax Old Fiddler's Convention to do a jam session styled studio recording.

So Like a jam session, there were no opportunities for overdubs, and on Kripplekrunk’s self titled debut album, which promises “13 Doses of  Instrumental Musical Medicine,” what you hear is what you get: spontaneous music-making by some great  pickers, fiddlers, and percussionists.

You can hear these self-described “extreme acoustic instrumentals” live in concert on May 3rd at Five-String Fest in Lawndale, NC, and on May 4th at the King Central Park from 5-7pm.  You can hear Rex play on May 6th for contra dancing at Salem College in Winston-Salem. 

Rex McGee  joined David Ford for a conversation last fall, along with guitarist John Garris, and cajon player Bobby Martin.

Faith Action International House

Over the last 18 years, FaithAction International House has served and accompanied over  30,000 new immigrants, while educating and connecting tens of thousands more. Their mission is to turn strangers into neighbors, and to create a better community for all Greensboro residents.

Recently,  the Greensboro City Council unanimously passed a resolution honoring the work of FaithAction International House, making Greensboro the nation's first "Stranger to Neighbor" City!

Faith Action keeps a full calendar, and their next Stranger to Neighbor dialogue is called Building Bridges through Soccer, and it takes place on Wednesday April 23rd at Westminster Presbyterian church in Greensboro. 

One of the many ways they open dialogues in our community is by holding musical and theatrical events. Last fall David Fraccaro and Endy Mendez stopped by to talk with David Ford about “Out of the Shadows: Stories of Hope and Courage from our newest Immigrant Neighbors.”

Wayne Shorter

Our next guest has been characterized by the New York Times as being " jazz's greatest living composer."

Those words carry weight, but they rest softly on the shoulders of renowned jazz saxophonist Wayne Shorter. From jamming with John Coltrane, to  Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers, to his days with Miles Davis, to the groundbreaking fusion band Weather Report, his musical resume is no joke.

The 80 year old Shorter  has reunited with Blue Note Records, the label that championed him as a bandleader back in the 1960s. On his latest album Without a Net, he leads a quartet that he’s been collaborating with for the past decade.  The album helped Shorter to win musician of the year, best album and top midsize ensemble from the 2014 Jazz Awards, and at this year’s Grammys, Shorter took home the golden gramophone for best improvised jazz solo for his composition "Orbits."

Wayne Shorter visited the Triad back in 2012, performing at Wait Chapel at a fundraiser for the Amazon Aid Foundation. Before he floored Winston-Salem audiences with his performance, he had a conversation with Triad Arts’ resident Wayne Shorter superfan, David Ford.

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