Economy
11:37 am
Thu December 12, 2013

North Carolinians Holding the Line on Holiday Spending

According to a High Point University Poll out this week, most North Carolinians plan to spend the same amount of money or less on the holidays this year than last year.

Credit Rachel A.K. via flickr creative commons

The survey found that 43 percent of those who participated said they will spend less on the holidays this year, while 38 percent said their spending will remain the same. 17 percent said they plan on spending more.  Most people (69%) say they'll spend $500 or less. Only 13% said they would likely spend more than $1,000.

The poll also found that more people will venture out to the stores to do their Christmas shopping than go online. 68%, or just a little more than two-thirds, say they'll get less than half of their gifts online.  The associate director of the HPU Poll, Dr. Sadie Leder Elder, said in a statement, "The North Carolina residents we surveyed are planning to go out to the stores to spend their  holiday money this year. Unfortunately, they don't plan to spend quite as much as they did last year."

Recent findings by Pew Research Center's American Life Project indicate that 71% of all American adults have used the Internet for shopping, but despite the ease and convenience of online shopping, most people still feel at least a little bit uncomfortable about sharing their credit card information over the Internet.

The High Point University poll also shows that North Carolinians are less than pleased by the expanding commercialization of the holidays. Nearly two-thirds of those asked said the season has become too commercialized -- and that it has lessened their enjoyment of it. But 29 percent of the poll respondents say they aren't bothered by the continuing commercialization, and that it hasn't spoiled their fun. Nine percent weren't sure.

And nearly half of respondents (49%) said they find the holiday season stressful, 45 % said they don't stress out during the season, and 11% said they actually experience less stress during the holidays.

To look at all of the findings of the High Point University Poll, click here.